INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSOR WALTER RUSSEL MEAD

Joe Becker Walter Russell Mead is the James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College and has also taught American Foreign Policy at Yale. He is the “Global View” columnist for The Wall Street Journal, and a scholar at the Hudson Institute. He has also been a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a board member of Aspenia, Aspen … Continue reading INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSOR WALTER RUSSEL MEAD

BREWING CHAOS

Kanishkh Kanodia During this epidemic, one of the most fundamental yet frequently overlooked questions policy-makers have had to confront  is drawing the line between ‘essential’ and ‘non-essential’ goods. Their decision determines what can and cannot be sold during lockdowns. The choice surrounding one commodity, in particular, has presented ethical and political quandaries: alcohol. While most nations have permitted the sale of liquor as essential goods … Continue reading BREWING CHAOS

THE AMERICAN PRESENCE IN JAPAN: 60 YEARS IN THE MAKING

Quang Trinh In 2019 and for the majority of the years following World War II, Japan, as opposed to American allies in Western Europe or the Middle East, has hosted the largest concentration of American troops outside of the US border. This should not come as a surprise, since security lies at the cornerstone of U.S-Japan relations. Given Trump’s “America’s First” rhetoric, the continued maritime … Continue reading THE AMERICAN PRESENCE IN JAPAN: 60 YEARS IN THE MAKING

CREATING A PATH TOWARD UNIVERSAL NATIONAL SERVICE

Guest Contributor: William Lloyd The litany of issues plaguing America seem painfully pervasive at the moment. As the federal government attempts to mitigate the ongoing health crisis, the country’s rampant inequity and pestilential fissures remain painfully ubiquitous. It’s not as if people weren’t well aware of the entrenched inequities prior to the crisis. People knew that the country that pays the most for healthcare globally also … Continue reading CREATING A PATH TOWARD UNIVERSAL NATIONAL SERVICE

ENDANGERED MUSEUMS: HOW COVID-19 THREATENS CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

Jia Yu As dust finally settles onto the cold marbled floors, a hollow silence prevails over the galleries and winding corridors. Invaluable paintings still hang on the walls and frozen statues yet reside on their pedestals. However, in the midst of our global pandemic, gone are the days where visitors from all corners of the world would pack into the museums, anxiously hoping to beset … Continue reading ENDANGERED MUSEUMS: HOW COVID-19 THREATENS CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

WHY THE RUSSIAN ORDER IN THE MIDDLE EAST IS A HOUSE OF CARDS

By Tim Sadov Until very recently, Russia had complete initiative and momentum for order building in the Middle East. While the Trump administration has scaled back commitments to U.S. allies, the Kremlin has built strategic partnerships with the governments of Egypt, Turkey, Syria, Iran, and Saudi Arabia. And these decisions seem to be paying off. Following the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Syria in late … Continue reading WHY THE RUSSIAN ORDER IN THE MIDDLE EAST IS A HOUSE OF CARDS

REGIONAL COOPERATION IN SOUTH ASIA: A DREAM OR REALITY?

Kanishkh Kanodia On March 15th, citizens of eight South Asian nations witnessed a historic spectacle: their leaders came together through a virtual conference to formulate a regional strategy in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. Initiated by the Prime Minister of India, this conference by SAARC—the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation—came at a time when the collective number of cases in the subcontinent had barely … Continue reading REGIONAL COOPERATION IN SOUTH ASIA: A DREAM OR REALITY?

ZIMBABWE AND THE PERILS OF REVOLUTION

Joe Becker Two and a half years ago, on November 19th, 2017, the once unthinkable happened. Robert Mugabe, at the time one of the oldest dictators in the world, resigned the Presidency of Zimbabwe after more than three decades in power—three decades which had seen the collapse of the Zimbabwean economy, the attempted genocide of the Ndebele people, and the ostracizing of the country to … Continue reading ZIMBABWE AND THE PERILS OF REVOLUTION

SOULS OF SUMPANGO

Jacquelyn Davila The truth is, we never really entered Sumpango, Sacatepequez. It was All Souls’ Day, November 1st, the day before the Day of the Dead, but we did not visit the cemetery. We stopped in the middle of the road and quickly hopped off our ride, a refurbished van that had probably been shipped to Guatemala from Korea. We exited as quickly as a … Continue reading SOULS OF SUMPANGO

THE POLITICS OF OIL

Quang Trinh The coronavirus pandemic would create the worst global economic crisis since the Great Depression, said IMF’s head Kristelina Georgieva. In the midst of the global turmoil, friction escalates between two geopolitical powerhouses: Russia and Saudi Arabia. The battle for arguably the world’s most important commodity, oil, should not come as a surprise. As international travel, commerce, and industrial production decline with the institution … Continue reading THE POLITICS OF OIL