In Moldova, President Sandu brings new focus to expanding ties

Sam Harshbarger On November 15, former Prime Minister and World Bank economist Maia Sandu defeated incumbent President Igor Dodon in Moldova’s most decisive election outcome in recent memory. Sandu’s Party of Action and Solidarity (PAS) dealt a decisive electoral blow to Dodon’s Party of Socialists of the Republic of Moldova (PSRM), the successor party to Moldova’s post-Soviet dominant communist apparatus. Moldova is a country of … Continue reading In Moldova, President Sandu brings new focus to expanding ties

On Feminism in South Korea

By Hadley Kim A popular singer uploads a photo of herself wearing a T-shirt that reads, “We Should All Be Feminists,” sparking a debate on social media on whether or not she is making a social statement in support of the feminist movement. Another takes a picture displaying her phone case with the words “Girls Can Do Anything,” leading to backlash from Korean netizens on … Continue reading On Feminism in South Korea

Why China Will Soon Have One of Its First Military Advantages over the United States

By Stanley Shapiro By every measure, the United States military is the most technologically advanced on the planet. Through the creation of fifth generation stealth fighter jets, nuclear powered aircraft carriers capable of launching fixed-wing aircraft, Ohio-class guided-missile submarines, and an array of other targeting systems and remote weapons capabilities, the US has firmly planted itself on top of the global military hierarchy, a supremacy … Continue reading Why China Will Soon Have One of Its First Military Advantages over the United States

Seventy Years after Annexation, the CCP Continues to Suppress the Tibetan People

By Kate Van Dusen While the cultural persecution of Tibetans by the Han majority government has long been an issue in Chinese society, in recent years the Chinese government’s efforts to stifle Tibetan traditions have moved past cultural suppression and begun to take an economic toll on those living in the region. Though the Chinese government has attempted to portray the practice of forced resettlement … Continue reading Seventy Years after Annexation, the CCP Continues to Suppress the Tibetan People

Israel Gains from a New Dialogue in the Middle East

By Rebecca Roth Just over two months ago, the United Arab Emirates agreed to normalize relations with Israel. Bahrain followed suit shortly thereafter. Analyzing the accords, it is clear that Israel is the winner of the deals. The Abraham Accords, named after the Patriarch Abraham—who is the father of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism—differs from the peace deals signed by Israel with Egypt and Jordan. Those … Continue reading Israel Gains from a New Dialogue in the Middle East

Nagorno-Karabakh and the Failure of International Diplomacy

Sam Harshbarger On the morning of September 27, fighting erupted along the line of contact between Azerbaijan and the self-declared Armenian statelet of Artsakh in the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh. The conflict marked an escalation of violence after a summer of bloody incidents in Tavush, along the border of Armenia and Azerbaijan. The fighting heralded a veritable beginning of the Second Nagorno-Karabakh War, eclipsing past incidents … Continue reading Nagorno-Karabakh and the Failure of International Diplomacy

INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSOR WALTER RUSSELL MEAD

Joe Becker Walter Russell Mead is the James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College and has also taught American Foreign Policy at Yale. He is the “Global View” columnist for The Wall Street Journal, and a scholar at the Hudson Institute. He has also been a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a board member of Aspenia, Aspen … Continue reading INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSOR WALTER RUSSELL MEAD

BREWING CHAOS

Kanishkh Kanodia During this epidemic, one of the most fundamental yet frequently overlooked questions policy-makers have had to confront  is drawing the line between ‘essential’ and ‘non-essential’ goods. Their decision determines what can and cannot be sold during lockdowns. The choice surrounding one commodity, in particular, has presented ethical and political quandaries: alcohol. While most nations have permitted the sale of liquor as essential goods … Continue reading BREWING CHAOS

THE AMERICAN PRESENCE IN JAPAN: 60 YEARS IN THE MAKING

Quang Trinh In 2019 and for the majority of the years following World War II, Japan, as opposed to American allies in Western Europe or the Middle East, has hosted the largest concentration of American troops outside of the US border. This should not come as a surprise, since security lies at the cornerstone of U.S-Japan relations. Given Trump’s “America’s First” rhetoric, the continued maritime … Continue reading THE AMERICAN PRESENCE IN JAPAN: 60 YEARS IN THE MAKING

CREATING A PATH TOWARD UNIVERSAL NATIONAL SERVICE

Guest Contributor: William Lloyd The litany of issues plaguing America seem painfully pervasive at the moment. As the federal government attempts to mitigate the ongoing health crisis, the country’s rampant inequity and pestilential fissures remain painfully ubiquitous. It’s not as if people weren’t well aware of the entrenched inequities prior to the crisis. People knew that the country that pays the most for healthcare globally also … Continue reading CREATING A PATH TOWARD UNIVERSAL NATIONAL SERVICE