Why China Will Soon Have One of Its First Military Advantages over the United States

By Stanley Shapiro By every measure, the United States military is the most technologically advanced on the planet. Through the creation of fifth generation stealth fighter jets, nuclear powered aircraft carriers capable of launching fixed-wing aircraft, Ohio-class guided-missile submarines, and an array of other targeting systems and remote weapons capabilities, the US has firmly planted itself on top of the global military hierarchy, a supremacy … Continue reading Why China Will Soon Have One of Its First Military Advantages over the United States

Seventy Years after Annexation, the CCP Continues to Suppress the Tibetan People

By Kate Van Dusen While the cultural persecution of Tibetans by the Han majority government has long been an issue in Chinese society, in recent years the Chinese government’s efforts to stifle Tibetan traditions have moved past cultural suppression and begun to take an economic toll on those living in the region. Though the Chinese government has attempted to portray the practice of forced resettlement … Continue reading Seventy Years after Annexation, the CCP Continues to Suppress the Tibetan People

Israel Gains from a New Dialogue in the Middle East

By Rebecca Roth Just over two months ago, the United Arab Emirates agreed to normalize relations with Israel. Bahrain followed suit shortly thereafter. Analyzing the accords, it is clear that Israel is the winner of the deals. The Abraham Accords, named after the Patriarch Abraham—who is the father of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism—differs from the peace deals signed by Israel with Egypt and Jordan. Those … Continue reading Israel Gains from a New Dialogue in the Middle East

NAGORNO-KARABAKH AND THE FAILURE OF INTERNATIONAL DIPLOMACY

Sam Harshbarger On the morning of September 27, fighting erupted along the line of contact between Azerbaijan and the self-declared Armenian statelet of Artsakh in the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh. The conflict marked an escalation of violence after a summer of bloody incidents in Tavush, along the border of Armenia and Azerbaijan. The fighting heralded a veritable beginning of the Second Nagorno-Karabakh War, eclipsing past incidents … Continue reading NAGORNO-KARABAKH AND THE FAILURE OF INTERNATIONAL DIPLOMACY

INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSOR WALTER RUSSELL MEAD

Joe Becker Walter Russell Mead is the James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College and has also taught American Foreign Policy at Yale. He is the “Global View” columnist for The Wall Street Journal, and a scholar at the Hudson Institute. He has also been a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a board member of Aspenia, Aspen … Continue reading INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSOR WALTER RUSSELL MEAD

CREATING A PATH TOWARD UNIVERSAL NATIONAL SERVICE

Guest Contributor: William Lloyd The litany of issues plaguing America seem painfully pervasive at the moment. As the federal government attempts to mitigate the ongoing health crisis, the country’s rampant inequity and pestilential fissures remain painfully ubiquitous. It’s not as if people weren’t well aware of the entrenched inequities prior to the crisis. People knew that the country that pays the most for healthcare globally also … Continue reading CREATING A PATH TOWARD UNIVERSAL NATIONAL SERVICE

ENDANGERED MUSEUMS: HOW COVID-19 THREATENS CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

Jia Yu As dust finally settles onto the cold marbled floors, a hollow silence prevails over the galleries and winding corridors. Invaluable paintings still hang on the walls and frozen statues yet reside on their pedestals. However, in the midst of our global pandemic, gone are the days where visitors from all corners of the world would pack into the museums, anxiously hoping to beset … Continue reading ENDANGERED MUSEUMS: HOW COVID-19 THREATENS CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

REGIONAL COOPERATION IN SOUTH ASIA: A DREAM OR REALITY?

Kanishkh Kanodia On March 15th, citizens of eight South Asian nations witnessed a historic spectacle: their leaders came together through a virtual conference to formulate a regional strategy in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. Initiated by the Prime Minister of India, this conference by SAARC—the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation—came at a time when the collective number of cases in the subcontinent had barely … Continue reading REGIONAL COOPERATION IN SOUTH ASIA: A DREAM OR REALITY?

ZIMBABWE AND THE PERILS OF REVOLUTION

Joe Becker Two and a half years ago, on November 19th, 2017, the once unthinkable happened. Robert Mugabe, at the time one of the oldest dictators in the world, resigned the Presidency of Zimbabwe after more than three decades in power—three decades which had seen the collapse of the Zimbabwean economy, the attempted genocide of the Ndebele people, and the ostracizing of the country to … Continue reading ZIMBABWE AND THE PERILS OF REVOLUTION

SOULS OF SUMPANGO

Jacquelyn Davila The truth is, we never really entered Sumpango, Sacatepequez. It was All Souls’ Day, November 1st, the day before the Day of the Dead, but we did not visit the cemetery. We stopped in the middle of the road and quickly hopped off our ride, a refurbished van that had probably been shipped to Guatemala from Korea. We exited as quickly as a … Continue reading SOULS OF SUMPANGO